Acknowledgements for Schedule Games

I’ve learned about schedule games from lots of people and projects. Here is the list of acknowledgements, as I remember them. If I left anyone off, please let me know.

We had a discussion of schedule games on the AYE wiki, which helped me remember just how many games there are.

I’m pretty sure I first discussed Schedule Chicken with Dave Smith and Jerry Weinberg. I recently discussed it more with Benson Margulies.

I can’t remember when I first learned about the name of 90 % done. I’m fairly sure it’s already in the literature somewhere. If anyone knows a definitive reference, I’d love to know what it is.

I learned about the name for Bring me a Rock from Jerry Weinberg.

I first learned about Hope is Our Most Important Strategy from Esther. And, Hal’s post triggered me to write this series.

I first heard of Queen of Denial from Benson Margulies.

I’d run into Sweep Under the Rug a bunch of times in my consulting practice, and I think I heard Elisabeth Hendrickson name it.

I first heard Tim Lister talk about Happy Date.

Elisabeth Hendrickson named Pants on Fire”.

I think I named Schedule == Commitment”. It’s funnier when I talk about it, show the guillotine maneuver and explain commitment. Update: Dave Smith may have had a hand in naming this game back in 1998.

My husband named Chasing Skirts (or We’ll Know Where We Are When We Get There).

I don’t know if Esther or I came up with the name The Schedule Tool is Always Right.

If you know of other schedule games, or have heard other references for these games, please let me know.

About Johanna Rothman

I help managers and leaders do reasonable things that work.
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2 Responses to Acknowledgements for Schedule Games

  1. David Chen says:

    The 90% Done game reminds me of an engineering rule of thumb. “The 90-90 rule of project schedules: The first 90 percent of the project takes 90 percent of the allotted time. The last 10 percent takes the other 90 percent.”

  2. Pingback: PM Interviews: Johanna Rothman « Outside of the Triangle

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