Thinking About Servant Leadership and Agile Project Management

For many people, agile means an end to all project management. I disagree. I find value in servant leadership in project management. I explain how you can think about servant leadership and agile project management in my projectmanagement.com column this month: Servant Leadership: The Agile Way. If you are looking to increase your servant leadership and help your project team (or program), check out the Influential Agile...

Influential Agile Leader, Boston and London, 2016

Is your agile transition proceeding well? Or, is it stuck in places—maybe the teams aren’t improving, maybe the people are multitasking, maybe you are tired and don’t know how you’ll find the energy to continue. You are the kind of person who would benefit from the Influential Agile Leader event in Boston, April 6-7, and in London, May 4-5, 2016. Gil Broza and I co-facilitate. It’s experiential, so you learn by doing. You practice your coaching and influence in the mornings. You’ll have a chance to map your organizational dynamics to see where to put your energy. You’ll split into smaller sessions in the afternoon, focusing on your business challenges. If you would like to bring your agile transition to the next level, or, at the very least, unstick it, please join us. Super early bird registration ends January 31 for London. Our super early bird for Boston is sold out, and the early bird registration is still a steal. If you have questions, please post a comment or email me. Hope to work with you there. (See the servant leadership tag for the Pragmatic Manager  and the leadership tag on this blog to see relevant articles I’ve written...

Public Workshops in 2016

I have several public workshops this year. I’m offering the Influential Agile Leader with Gil Broza April 6-7, 2016 in Boston and May 4-5, 2016 London. If you have not read some of my writing about leadership, take a look at these previous newsletters: ▪ Lead Your Agile Transition Through Influence ▪ Creating an Environment of Leadership ▪ Discovering Your Leadership Early bird registration for Influential Agile Leader ends Feb 29, 2016. In addition, I am offering these online workshops in March: * Practical Product Ownership * Writing Non-Fiction Workshop 1 Super early bird registration ends January 15, 2016. I hope you decide to join me and we can learn...

Writing Workshop 1: Write Non-Fiction to Enhance Your Business and Reputation

Are you a consultant or other entrepreneur? If so, you know that you can improve your visibility, marketing and selling by writing. Writing articles and books can help people look for you, your ideas, products and services. You sell yourself through your writing. Does this describe your writing experience so far: You know what you want to say, and you’re not sure how to say it. You look at a blank page and wonder, “What the heck should I say?” You’ve started any number of articles or books and haven’t finished any or enough. You have articles, and you’re not sure where to place them for maximum effect. If so, this workshop is for you. I started my consulting business in 1994. I knew I had to speak and write to earn the kind of living I wanted. I started writing articles in 1997. I published my first book in 2004 and have since published 10 more books. People know me through my writing and what my writing says about me. My writing sells me, my consulting services and workshops. When you write, your writing can sell you, too. If you’re not sure how to write or what to write, this course is for you. Here’s what you’ll learn: Session 1: Benefits of writing. How to make writing a habit. How to improve your writing throughput. Session 2: How to decide what to write about. How to structure an article. What great articles look like. Session 3: The difference between writing and editing. Tools to make editing easier. The value of other people as reviewers. Session 4: How to get...

Trust, Accountability, and Where Does the Time Go?

As more of my clients transition to agile, many of them have a fascinating question: How do I assess who is doing what on my team? When I ask why they want to know, they say it’s all related to reviews, rewards, and general compensation. They are still discussing individual compensation, not team compensation. When I ask why they want to reward individuals instead of the team, they say, “I am sure some people do more work than others. I want to reward them, and not the other people.” Interesting idea. And, wrong for agile teams. Also wrong for any innovation or learning that you want to happen as a team (regardless of whether you are agile or not). Agile is a team-based approach to work. Why would you want to reward some people more than others? If the team is not sure that they are working well together, they need to learn to provide each other feedback. If the team doesn’t know how to manage team membership, a manager can facilitate that membership discussion and problem-solving. Then, the managers can transition team membership issues to the team, with manager as backup/facilitator. What I see is that the managers want to control team membership. Instead, why not let the team control its membership? I often see that the managers want to control feedback: who provides it and who receives it. Instead, why not train everyone in how to provide and receive feedback? When managers want to reward some people more than others, they imply that some people are less capable than others—something agile is supposed to fix with teamwork....