Where I Think “Agile” is Headed, Part 3: What Is The Recipe, The Right Answer?

I started this series asking where “Agile” was headed. Part 1 was about the 4 big problems I see. Part 2 was why we need managers. This part is about how people want a recipe, The Answer, for how to get better at “Agile.” Before we can address what an answer might be, your need …

Where I Think “Agile” is Headed, Part 2: Where Does Management Fit?

In Part 1, I wrote about how “Agile” is not a silver bullet and is not right for every team and every product. This post is about how management fits into agile approaches. Too often, managers think “agile” is for others, specifically teams of people. Teams need to figure out how to manage their WIP, …

Where I Think “Agile” is Headed, Part 1: Do You Need an Agile Approach?

I spoke at Agile 2019 last week. I had both a great time and a heart-rending realization. The great time was meeting and reconnecting with people. The heart-rending realization is our industry is in big, big trouble. Here are my thoughts and where I think the “agile” industry is headed. Problems I See with “Agile” …

Announcement: New Distributed Agile Teams Online Workshop

After Mark Kilby and I collaborated on From Chaos to Successful Distributed Agile Teams, we decided to start creating online classes. We have just opened registration for our first geographically distributed agile teams class. See Prepare for Successful Distributed Agile Teams. It’s a self-study class. That means you can proceed at your own pace. You’ll …

Serendipitous Communications in Geographically Distributed Agile Teams

One of the experiences people miss in distributed teams compared to collocated teams is the ability to serendipitously bump into other team members or just other people. They like the idea of having random encounters to share what they did for the weekend or, more importantly, discuss problems they are struggling with at work. Sometimes …

Tactical Ideas for Agile Budgeting, Part 1

Too often, organizations want to budget for an entire year. The managers run around for two or three months in advance of that fiscal year, attempting to predict a ton of things: Estimates for not-well-defined projects or features, Capital equipment or tool needs, “Headcount” aka, people needed. Then, the organization doesn’t finalize the budget until …