Organizing An Agile Program, Part 5: Measurements That Might Mean Something to a Program

This is the last in this series of organizing the agile program management posts. It won’t be the last of all the posts, it’s just the last in the series of organizing posts. If I’d realized how many words I was writing in each post I’m not sure I would have started the series. Yes, …

Management Myth #10: I Can Measure the Work by the Time People Spend at Work

“Have you heard the new thing that Andrew is doing?” Gabe asked, shaking his head as he headed towards the cafeteria with Cynthia. “No, what?” Cynthia said. “We have to fill out time cards with our actual time on them. He wants to know how much time we really spend at work. The more time, …

Are We There Yet?: Creating Project Dashboards to Display Progress

When it comes to projects, there are as many questions to answer as there are project teams, but “Where are we?” is by far the most popular. The key to understanding a project is to make regular measurements—both quantitative and qualitative—and display the measurements publicly. When project managers display these measurements as part of the …

Showing Project Progress (NOT percent complete)

Last night at my SPIN talk someone came up to me at the end of the talk. I’d discussed earned value and inch-pebbles in my talk but hadn’t specifically discussed how to avoid the dreaded “percent complete” reporting problem to management. The percent complete problem occurs when you have to report progress to management as …