What Happens When You Can't Finish What You Wanted in an Iteration?

  I ran a little workshop today about transitioning to agile. I was talking about timeboxed iterations, and one of the participants asked this question. “So I don’t quite finish one of the features I want to finish in this iteration–and it’s the end of the project. I think it’s going to take me a …

Iterations Keep Sponsors Involved

  Several years ago, a colleague emailed me, asking how to keep sponsors involved. My colleague was using company-mandated phase-gate lifecycle with long project durations (18-24 months). I’d recommended providing a project dashboard and showing the sponsor progress. My colleague was stumped–the dashboard wasn’t particularly helpful until they were in the testing phase and it …

An Incremental Technique to Pay Off Testing Technical Debt

Technical debt is the unfinished work the product development team accumulated from previous releases. This debt includes: design debt, where the design is insufficiently robust in some areas; development debt, where pieces of the code are missing; and testing debt, where tests were not developed or run against the code. Technical debt is common, but …

An Incremental Technique to Pay Off Testing Technical Debt

Technical debt is the unfinished work the product development team accumulated from previous releases. This debt includes: design debt, where the design is insufficiently robust in some areas; development debt, where pieces of the code are missing; and testing debt, where tests were not developed or run against the code. Technical debt is common, but …

Frequency of Iterations is Related to Speed of Release

  I’m working with a group of people who are new to iterative development. They’re doing more of a staged delivery lifecycle than an agile lifecycle, but they are releasing about once a month. They don’t like it, because they say they’re releasing too frequently. The problem is that their planning and releasing take too …