Context Matters: Premature Optimization or Habits From Long Ago?

I’m at the Much Ado About Agile conference this week, in beautiful Vancouver. During lunch one day, one of the conference participants started talking about premature optimization of code. Well, I know a few things about that. When I started to work professionally as a developer, I wrote in assembly language. We had 256 bytes …

Kill, Commit, or Transform Your Projects

Daniel wrote a lovely post, Kill, commit, or transform your projects over on praglife. Keeping projects around that are not staffed, multitasking on several projects (committing to none of them), and running away from reality doesn’t help anyone. The projects don’t finish faster–they finish, if at all, slower. The people don’t have a sense of …

Abandoning vs. Killing Projects

John Cook, wrote a lovely post, Peter Drucker and abandoning projects, explaining how Drucker talks about abandoning projects. (John, thanks, I will definitely be referencing Drucker in the PPM book.) I haven’t been using the word “abandon” when I describe stopping projects. I’ve been using the word “Kill” and the concepts of permanently stopping projects …

A Little More About Program Management

Glen Alleman has a post about program management, Managing Multiple Projects is Called Program Management which got me thinking. (I’ve written about program management in the past also: Program Management: Multiple Projects With Multiple Deliverables.) But in the portfolio management book, I defined a few ways to think about your projects as programs: You, and …

Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great

  Want to save time on your next project? Improve working relationships? Understand what contributed to your success–or what didn’t? You’ll need a retrospective to do these things, and if you want a great retrospective, you’ll buy a copy of Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great by Esther Derby and Diana Larsen. A retrospective provides …